Original research

Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea in sleep consultations in Burkina Faso: Implications for monitoring

A R OUEDRAOGO, A Tiendrebeogo, K Boncoungou, E Birba, G A Ouédraogo, M M Assao Neino, G Bougma, G Ouédraogo, G Badoum, M Ouédraogo

Abstract


Background. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is the most common respiratory disorder related to sleep. Its prevalence in developed countries varies from 3% to 28%. In several African countries, including Burkina Faso, this syndrome is still under-diagnosed and goes largely untreated. It is necessary to conduct studies in different contexts to determine the characteristics and develop the strategies for management of OSAS.

Objectives. To determine the prevalence of OSAS in Burkina Faso. Methods. This prospective study recruited 106 patients coming for consultation for sleep disorders at the Yalgado Ouedraogo University Hospital Center, who responded to a self-questionnaire and were diagnosed by respiratory polygraphy.

Results. A total of 77 patients (72.6%) had OSAS. The male to female ratio was 1.4:1 and the mean (standard deviation) age was 47.8 (12.8) years. The majority of the patients (53.8%) were obese. The main reason for consultation was snoring (84%), followed by hypopnea-apnoea reported (59.4%) and daytime sleepiness (45.3%). The most common comorbidity factor was hypertension (50%), followed by decreased libido (16%) and diabetes (13.2%). A continuous positive-pressure (CPAP) machine was prescribed to 51.25% of the patients, but only 22% were able to acquire it.

Conclusion. The monitoring of OSAS is relatively new in Burkina Faso. This study showed the profile of patients with OSAS and difficulties in accessing continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices for treatment.


Authors' affiliations

A R OUEDRAOGO, Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

A Tiendrebeogo, Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

K Boncoungou, Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

E Birba, Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Souro Sanou, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso

G A Ouédraogo, Department of Pulmonology, Regional Hospital of Ouahigouya, Ouahigouya, Burkina Faso

M M Assao Neino, Department of Pulmonology, National Hospital Lamordé, Niamey, Niger

G Bougma, Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

G Ouédraogo, Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

G Badoum, Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

M Ouédraogo, Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

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Cite this article

African Journal of Thoracic and Critical Care Medicine 2020;26(3):74-80. DOI:10.7196/AJTCCM.2020.v26i3.042

Article History

Date submitted: 2020-09-16
Date published: 2020-10-13

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